Double Cluck Farms | Upland Game Hunting
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Upland Game Hunting

Upland Game Hunting

You just can’t find upland hunting, like Double Cluck offers, anywhere these days.  We are a licensed “Game Preserve” with the state of Illinois.  This means we can extend our upland hunting season for our members.  It also means that we release birds but this isn’t your typical “boot ‘n shoot” club.  Our birds are raised by top notch quail and pheasant producers.  We release birds on a set schedule before, during and after hunting season.  Our management staff works hard to give the released birds every advantage possible over the predators…which include the bird hunters and their dogs.  Release areas are established and maintained during the course of the year to ensure food, water and cover for the birds.  Large brush piles have been introduced and are added constantly to the property.  You can find a quail or pheasant on almost any part of the 1,000 acre property, which adds to the birds survival rate.  We release over 1,000 quail and 300 pheasants annually. If you like rabbit hunting, well we have tons of those little guys too.  Rabbits are open to hunting during the regular Illinois rabbit hunting season.

Successful upland hunting comes from a stringent management plan.  When developing grass, clover, wheat, or shrub plantings we always keep the birds and hunters in mind.  Everything we do on the property impacts our wild and released bird populations in a positive way.  Breeding and nesting habitat, cover plots, and food sources are managed each and every year.  We work closely with Pheasants Forever, and government agencies to establish meaningful habitat for our birds.  We use food and water systems in conjunction with brush piles and cover to provide a healthy start for released birds.  You will have a hard time distinguishing between a wild bird and a released bird when that covey gets up under your feet.  Over the last several years our number of released pheasants harvested and wild pheasants harvested has been documented around 50/50.  This is a great sign that our management program and extreme dedication to this managment style is starting to pay off.  Its not uncommon to see pheasants and quail on our neighboring properties nowadays, which means we are doing our part in maintaining habitat for these delicate species